WATCH: Sirens sign overseas stars

first_imgAiken-Pinnock will join Scottish Thistles’ emerging goal attack Jo Pettitt in replacing Althea Byfield and Lynsey Gallagher in the Sirens line-up for the upcoming Super League season scheduled to begin in February.While Halpenny, who played for Canterbury Tactix and Waikato Bay of Plenty Magic in the ANZ Championship, has been brought in as goal shooter.The Sirens will be one of the three new teams, along with Severn Stars and Wasps in the top flight domestic league next season and the changes are seen as another big step forward in developing the sport.Led by head coach Gail Parata and Franchise Director Karen McElveen, the Sirens have combined a squad of international and home-grown recruits that will play at the new £113m Emirates Arena in Galgow and will be supported by the University of the West of Scotland.Sky Sports News HQ spoke to the national team’s two new signings as they prepare for the start of the season by getting to know their new surroundings better.last_img read more

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​Long wait for women’s basketball team

first_imgBetty Angula, Emily Koivi, Cindy Elavo, Marca Muri, Mary Elavo, Nester Sape and Rosa Kairi were all members of the women’s national side that finished in fourth place at the 2015 Pacific Games.“We felt like we should have won a medal,” Angula said when reflecting on 2015.“We’ve had two years to think about it and have learned a lot since then. We have really tried to improve on the areas we needed to get better.“Now we have the opportunity to redeem ourselves at the Melanesia Cup and we’ll be doing our best to finish with a medal this time.”The Pepsi PNG women’s national team will open their 2017 FIBA Melanesia Basketball Cup campaign against defending Pacific champions Fiji.The players are looking forward to playing the Oceania powerhouse, who recently competed in the FIBA Women’s Asia Cup tournament in India this past July.“They are the best women’s side in the Pacific but we won’t be backing down.”Following the Fiji match-up, the host side will then face New Caledonia on Thursday afternoon before taking on the Solomon Islands on day three.In a statement, veteran forward and recently named team captain, Marca Muri, said it was Papua New Guinea’s time.“Coach has been working us really hard in training and I think the girls are ready to go,” Muri said.“We’ll go out there and do our best to represent our country with passion and pride.”The 2017 FIBA Melanesia Basketball Cup presented by Paradise Beverages commences on Wednesday, September 27, at the Taurama Aquatic & Indoor Centre (TAIC).last_img read more

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Apollon and Apoel close in on Cyprus Cup final

first_imgThe second legs of the Cyprus Cup semi-finals were rendered little more than a formality as Apollon trounced Anorthosis 6-0 while Apoel won 2-0 at Doxa Katokopias.Holders Apollon steamrolled past hapless Anorthosis with an ease that even their most die-hard fans could not have dreamed of.From the very first whistle Apollon poured forward creating massive problems for the visitors’ defence who were in total disarray.The Limassol side opened the score through Maglica in the 13th minute. Sardinero doubled the advantage ten minutes before the break while two minutes later Vinicius powered in the third.In the second half Apollon dropped down a gear but were still able to add three more goals against their demoralised opponents.In the 53rd minute, Anorthosis’ Kalo upended Papoulis in the penalty area and the same player picked himself up to score the fourth while Makrides, returning after a lengthy injury, scored a fifth two minutes from time. Apollon still had time for one more through Piech in the first minute minute of added time.Despite another poor performance, Apoel all but booked their place in the final with a 2-0 away win over relegation-threatened Doxa.Both managers rested key players in view of important league games ahead and it showed as neither side were able to find the telling blow in the final third of the pitch.Apoel were fortunate to take the lead on the stroke of half-time through Barral who blasted the ball past Doxa goalkeeper Negri from close range.Central defender Astiz headed home the second in the 62nd minute following a corner by Embezilio, making the return leg a chance for the Nicosia giants to give a run out to fringe players.last_img read more

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Nadal has eyes on world number one ranking in Montreal

first_imgRafael Nadal will return to the top of the ATP world rankings for the first time in three years if he reaches the semi-finals at this week’s Rogers Cup in Montreal.The 31-year-old Spaniard, top seed in Canada in the absence of current world number one Andy Murray, ended last year ranked nine after taking time off to recover from a wrist injury.While the return of the Mallorcan to the summit would be an incredible turnaround, the French Open champion is refusing to get carried away as he seeks a fourth Rogers Cup title.“I don’t even think about that now. I’m trying to have the right preparation now and that’s it,” Nadal told the ATP’s website.“I’m going to keep trying to play the way I did in the first part of the season, so if I’m able to make that happen, I hope to have a chance to do well,” said Nadal, who is preparing for his first action since losing an epic contest to Gilles Muller in the fourth round of Wimbledon.Fifteen-times grand slam champion Nadal has spent a career total of 141 weeks as world number one – seventh on the list.Murray, who is missing from Montreal as he treats a hip problem, has been ranked number one since last November having claimed five successive titles.Nadal opens in Montreal against either Croatia’s Borna Coric or Russian Mikhail Youzhny.Second seed Roger Federer also returns to action in Montreal having won his eighth Wimbledon title last month.The 35-year-old Swiss is also challenging to return to the world number one spot he has occupied for a record total of 302 weeks during his career.last_img read more

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Infantino still committed to VAR at World Cup

first_imgFIFA President Gianni Infantino has not had any second thoughts about using video assistant referees (VAR) at this year’s World Cup, he told Reuters, despite recent controversies involving the new technology.His UEFA counterpart Aleksander Ceferin said, however, that the system would not be used in next season’s Champions League.VAR, which allows match referee to review decisions on a pitchside monitor or by consulting an assistant who monitors the game on a video, has been trialled in a number of competitions over the past year.Football’s law-making body IFAB is expected to decide on Saturday whether to authorise its use on a permanent basis and Infantino has said that, if VAR is approved, FIFA will use it at this year’s World Cup in Russia.However, it has proved controversial especially in Italy’s Serie A where there have been cases of penalties being revoked after a wait of several minutes or goals being disallowed for minor infringements after similar delays.Critics say it has taken the spontaneity out of the sport and left fans confused.“We have to base decisions on facts and not feelings,” Infantino said on the sidelines of the UEFA Congress.“The facts are that from almost 1,000 matches which were tested, the accuracy rate of the referees went up from 93 percent to 99 percent.“If we, or I, can do something to make sure that the World Cup is not decided by a referee’s mistakes, then I think it’s our duty to do it.“Much more time is wasted on throw-ins or free kicks, rather than on correcting a potentially wrong decision with VAR, so I’m still very positive.”Infantino added that controversy was part and parcel of Serie A – with or without VAR.“If you lose the match, before it was the fault of the referee, now it’s the fault of VAR…that’s part of the customs, of the traditions of Italian football as well,” he said.Ceferin later told a news conference he was not necessarily against VAR but that it needed more time.“We will not use it in the Champions League next season,” he said.“I see a lot of confusion…I think there is no way back any more but we have to educate the referees properly, we have to explain to the fans when it can be used.“Fans keep seeing the (VAR) screen all the time but nobody knows how it works. For me, it might be a good project but we shouldn’t rush it.”last_img read more

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Southgate says early start has taken toll on players

first_imgEngland coach Gareth Southgate said the Premier League’s early start was a factor in some of his players lacking sharpness or suffering from injury and questioned why the season began less than a month after the World Cup final.The English top flight was the earliest of the major European leagues to start this season, kicking off on Aug. 10, a week before Spain’s La Liga and Italy’s Serie A and a fortnight ahead of Germany’s Bundesliga.Southgate, whose side reached the World Cup semi-finals in July, believes his players and teams across the league are paying the consequences of a lack of rest.“I don’t understand why our league started so early but it did and it’s a really difficult situation for the clubs,” Southgate said in a news conference on Sunday ahead of England’s UEFA Nations League game away to Spain on Monday.“Some couldn’t field a team. Look at Tottenham, they had so many players in the semi-final and they had to put players straight into matches, it’s an impossible situation for the coaches really.”England captain Harry Kane, on a six-game goal drought for his country yet in good form for Tottenham, is one player believed to be suffering from a lack of rest, although the striker has said he does not need time off.Danny Rose and Luke Shaw are two of five players missing for England due to injury.“I think it’s a lack of psychological freshness rather than physical,” added Southgate.“When you look at the league, there’s a lot of teams that have got going yet; there’s been lots of injuries.”England are joint bottom of Nations League A Group 4 with Croatia, on one point, following Friday’s 0-0 draw between the two sides, making Monday’s game against group leaders Spain vital to their bid to avoid being relegated to League B.Southgate is without defender John Stones and midfielder Jordan Henderson through suspension and said Joe Gomez and Harry Winks would come in for the two absent players, adding that he was not overly concerned about his team’s inability to take their chances against Croatia despite dominating the play.“No, the concern would be if we weren’t creating chances. The most important thing is that we were dangerous, looked a threat and got in good positions to score goals,” added Southgate.“With the players we have got, if we continue to create those chances, they will score them.”last_img read more

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Fury hints at ring rust ahead of Las Vegas debut

first_imgTyson Fury finally engaged in mind games with Tom Schwarz as he prepared to fight in Las Vegas for the first time.The 30-year-old fights at the revered MGM Grand on Saturday night, his first outing since meeting Deontay Wilder in December last year when they fought to a thrilling draw.Saturday’s fight was made with the intention of furthering Fury’s growing profile in the United States, ahead of an anticipated rematch with dangerous WBC champion Wilder next year.Even by Fury’s standards he has proved engaging in the build-up to this fight, making his struggles with depression and suicide known to the US audience and even complimenting Schwarz on his appearance in a largely tension-free preamble.The 25-year-old German has similarly not attempted to intimidate Fury ahead of the biggest fight of his life, but on the eve of nearing his lifelong ambition of fighting in Vegas, Fury questioned if he will be properly prepared.His remarkable performance against Wilder, after close to three-and-a-half years of inactivity, demonstrated his natural talent had not waned.He has made little secret of his desire to fight as quickly as possible after December, and even insisted he could not take confidence from his performance against Wilder because he believed he should have stopped the American inside six rounds.“I’ve been out of the ring for (over) six months, so I’ll have to start again,” Fury told Press Association Sport.“That’s seven months’ inactivity. I only had six months of activity before that. They spoke about (Gennady) Golovkin being out of the ring for nine months as his biggest lay-off ever; I’ve just had seven.“Seven months out of the ring is a hell of a long time. I hope I’m going to get active this next six months; the first six months of this year have been quite terrible because I didn’t get the fight I wanted and have been made to wait until June.“Going 12 rounds with Deontay Wilder doesn’t give me any confidence. It actually makes me have concerns – I thought I could get Deontay Wilder out of there within six rounds, so having to go 12 with him wasn’t great. I should have done better.“Against Wilder I was 17st 12lbs; today I’m 18st 12lbs. (But) I’ve put on a stone of muscle in all of the right places.”Suggestions persist that Fury has already agreed terms for a rematch with Wilder next year, which will be even more in demand following Anthony Joshua’s shock defeat to Andy Ruiz Jr, but he insisted that those suggestions remain premature and accused Wilder of using them for publicity.“Deontay Wilder’s living his life in my reputation and the fight he had with me,” he said.“I’m here headlining in Vegas, and he’s (saying) ‘I want a rematch with Tyson to try and get that loss out of my mind’. He knows he was beaten soundly.“I’m enjoying my life, thinking about Tom Schwarz, and every time Wilder looks in the mirror he knows he lost a fight. I’m the only unbeaten heavyweight at the top; Wilder’s lost, Joshua’s lost and Ruiz has lost. They’ve all lost apart from me.“I haven’t agreed to anything past Tom Schwarz.”last_img read more

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Bale cements future at Real Madrid with contract extension

first_img“I grew up watching the Premier League and Real Madrid, but when you have the opportunity to play here you cannot waste it,” Bale said. “I’m only thinking about Real Madrid and I am very happy to be here.”Bale arrived in Spain with incredibly high expectations after Madrid broke its own record for transfers by paying Tottenham 101 million euros in 2013. That record stood until Manchester United shelled out 105 million euros for Paul Pogba in August.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentWhile the team is still very much Cristiano Ronaldo’s, Bale has become a reliable and often electric second scorer with a knack for netting key goals that have helped Madrid win two Champions League titles and one Copa del Rey.Bale, who had been linked to rumors of a move back to the Premier League with Manchester United, said staying at Madrid was an easy choice. Real Madrid’s Gareth Bale leaves a press conference at the Santiago Bernabeu stadium. Bale has agreed to a contract extension with the club that will tie the Wales winger to the European champions through 2022. APMADRID — With his focus on winning more trophies, Gareth Bale signed a new deal Monday (Tuesday Manila time) that ties him to Real Madrid until 2022.The Wales forward inked the three-year contract extension at the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium. Now 27, Bale will be two weeks short of 33 when his new deal runs out.ADVERTISEMENT FEU, NU strike big in 2016 PBA Draft BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town View comments PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUNDcenter_img 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas We are young MOST READ Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “The most important thing is to concentrate on my football,” Bale said. “I came to improve and I love it. I made the right decision. We’ve won two Champions Leagues, I want to keep winning titles and Real Madrid can offer that. The club is at the same level as my ambitions.”Bale added that while he continues to address the media in English, his Spanish is getting better as he settles in.“I have improved my Spanish, my family is more integrated and I feel that the fans love me,” he said. “The more time you spend more here, the more integrated you are, and all I do is try to help the team win as many titles as possible.”ADVERTISEMENT EDITORS’ PICK Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportslast_img read more

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Ground-feeding birds in Southeast Asia may be going extinct outside protected areas

first_imgAnimals, Birds, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Poaching, UCSC, Wildlife Article published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Quails, partridges and pheasants, together called galliforms, are becoming increasingly restricted to protected areas in Southeast Asia.Five species of galliforms, including three endemics, might no longer survive outside protected areas, a new study predicts.Many local extinctions have occurred in Sumatra, where habitat loss appears more pronounced.Researchers find that protected areas are becoming increasingly isolated and are not integrated into the wider landscape. Nature reserves in large parts of Southeast Asia may be the last strongholds for charismatic ground-feeding birds such as quails, partridges and pheasants, together called galliforms, according to a recent study in Conservation Letters.Researchers estimate that five species of galliforms no longer survive outside protected areas in Sundaland, a region comprising the Malay Peninsula and the islands of Sumatra, Borneo, Java and Bali. Extirpations are highest in Sumatra’s unprotected lands, where 50 percent of galliform species appear lost.“We looked at Sundaland because it’s a region extremely rich in biodiversity, yet undergoing high levels of environmental degradation,” said Elizabeth Boakes, a conservation scientist at University College London and co-author of the study.Sumatran partridge (Arborophila sumatrana), endemic to the island of Sumatra, no longer survives outside protected areas, according to researchers. Photo by Roland WirthDeforestation rates in Southeast Asia are among the highest in tropics, making protected areas increasingly isolated. “But the amount of protected land itself is very small,” Boakes said. Nature reserves account for about 12 percent of Sundaland’s total land mass.Some of these reserves aren’t permanent. In the last few years, 8,360 square kilometres (3,230 square miles) of Sundaland’s protected area has been lost to downsizing and downgrading.Boakes and her team recognized that protected areas might only be part of a successful conservation strategy for galliforms. So they wanted to know the extent to which the birds survived outside of those zones.Her team scoured through 150 years of museum collection records, scientific literature and recent citizen science databases for information on galliform sighting dates, locations and species.“A lot of these species are charismatic, and people go out looking for them,” Boakes said.Distribution of galliform records outside protected areas in Sundaland. Records from eBird are in red, records from other sources in brown. Protected areas are in green. This map is in the supporting information section of Boakes et al. (2018)The research team used gaps in the sighting history of each species to predict whether that species no longer existed outside protected areas. Statistical methods allowed them to infer extinction for species that were spotted frequently in the past with fewer recent sightings, as opposed to those that were only seen sporadically.To Boakes, the findings were surprising.  Her team found no sighting records for 13 of the 52 galliform populations outside nature reserves in the last 20 years. “I don’t think we expected there to be so many local extinctions,” she said.Three Sundaic endemics – the Dulit partridge (Rhizothera dulitensis), the grey-breasted partridge (Arborophila orientalis) and the Sumatran partridge (Arborophila sumatrana) – now live only inside protected areas, the researchers concluded.“These species are very specialized in their habitat requirements. So they are not able to withstand, as far as we can see, change in their habitat,” said Dr. Philip McGowan, a galliform conservation specialist at the University of Newcastle, U.K. and co-author of the study.Grey-breasted partridge (Arborophila orientalis), listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, no longer survives outside protected areas in Sundaland, according to researchers. Photo by Roland WirthIn Sumatra, where the team recorded the highest number of extinctions, six galliform populations have been potentially wiped out. “Habitat loss is far more pronounced and far more advanced on Sumatra,” said McGowan.But a scientist who works at IUCN critiqued the study by noting that the results could be an artifact of variations in citizen birding efforts from place to place and over the years. He reckons that if similar amounts of across-the-country birding took place in Sumatra, as it did on the Malay Peninsula, more out-of-protected area species sightings would be added there too.McGowan agrees there may still be some unrecorded galliform populations outside reserves, but he stands by the main outcome. “I think we can have confidence that a pattern wherein some species are retreating to protected areas does hold true,” he said.Nurul Wirani, a conservation biologist from the University of Indonesia in Depok, concurs. “This pattern is almost the same, not just for galliforms, but for other birds and animals too,” said Wirani, who was not part of the study.But for protected areas to function at their full conservation potential, they must be connected by adjacent tracts of land where the birds also can live, Boakes stated: “For me, the aim of conservation is not having biodiversity isolated in little protected areas, but areas outside need to managed sustainably in ways that will accommodate biodiversity in the long-term.”King Quail in Singapore . Photo by Nitin Srinivasamurthy.CitationBoakes, E. H., Fuller, R. A., & McGowan, P. J. (2018). The extirpation of species outside protected areas. Conservation Letters, e12608. DOI: 10.1111/conl.12608Priyanka Runwal (@priyanka_runwal) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here.last_img read more

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Adapt to a changing Amazon now, or pay far higher price later, experts say

first_imgAmazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Modeling, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by hayat Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img A new study estimates the costs of delaying adaptation to a hotter, dryer Amazon would be orders of magnitude higher than acting now, despite uncertainties.The study is the first comprehensive impact analysis of the Amazon Forest Dieback hypothesis, which posits that there exists a definitive climate-driven deforestation tipping point beyond which large swaths of the rainforest would be rapidly replaced with savanna.The study’s authors estimate the costs of such a catastrophic loss of forest could be as high as $3.6 trillion over a 30-year period.They also estimate that the cost of a series of adaptation measures taken now would be $122 billion, a fraction of the economic losses estimated if no actions were taken. The costs of acting now to adapt to a predicted, dramatic loss of Amazon rainforest would be at least one order of magnitude lower than the economic fallout if we waited and did nothing, a new study says.It’s the first comprehensive impact analysis of a contentious prediction: that there exists a definitive climate-driven deforestation tipping point beyond which large swaths of the Amazon rainforest would be rapidly replaced with savanna.In their study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, David Lapola from the University of Campinas in São Paulo, Brazil, and colleagues estimated the costs of such a catastrophic loss of forest would be between $957 billion and $3.6 trillion over a 30-year period. The cost of adapting now, on the other hand, could be as little as $122 billion.Born out of modeling studies in the late 1990s, the Amazon Forest Dieback (AFD) hypothesis suggests that with severe increases in temperature and reductions in rainfall projected under some climate models, the Amazon biome would experience sudden and catastrophic loss of biomass, transforming lush rainforest into a more drought-tolerant savanna.Savanna in Serra da Canastra National Park in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Image by Klaus Balzano on VisualHunt.com (CC BY-NC).The Amazon generates up to 50 percent of its own rainfall by recycling water through plants in a process known as transpiration, though climate change is resulting in deepening drought. Rapid and large-scale deforestation, reducing the number of trees transpiring, could push the biome closer to the tipping point for massive forest dieback. That tipping point was initially estimated at 40 percent deforestation, but was more recently revised down to the 20-25 percent range. The Amazon is presently estimated to be roughly 17-19 percent deforested.In their study, the team estimated the economic costs to different sectors based on the costs reported for past droughts or from published estimates generated by computer models. They found that reduced crop yields, fishing stocks and hydroelectric output, as well as disrupted transport networks and large-scale climate-driven migration caused by even moderate levels of AFD, would cost $44 billion over a period of 30 years – an annual cost of 1.9 percent of the total GDP of the Brazilian Amazon in 2015. AFD could also lead to negative social impacts, such as reduced food security and increased risk of mosquito-borne diseases like malaria.The researchers also considered other ecosystem services that are not valued based on current economic indicators, such as carbon stocks, pollination, provision of clean water resources, local climate regulation, and cultural and recreational benefits. They estimated that the true total bill could be many times higher: between $1 trillion and $3.6 trillion over 30 years, or an annual cost of between 42 percent and 107 percent of the Amazon’s GDP in 2015.Delphine Clara Zemp, an ecologist and biogeographer at the University of Göttingen in Germany, who was not involved in the present study, said the findings represented “a great step forward to show policymakers that AFD should be considered seriously despite the large uncertainties.”A single tree stands in a soy field next to rainforest, south of Santarem and along the BR 163 highway. Roads like this one, which cuts through the Brazilian Amazon for 1,700 kilometers (1,056 miles), allow access to the rainforest, and are a major cause of new deforestation. Image by Daniel Beltrà/Greenpeace.Even small climate-driven changes in forest composition, such as an increase in drought-tolerant tree species that transpire less, could have far-reaching socioeconomic impacts. “A reduction in the transference of humidity from the [Amazon] forest to the atmosphere would have serious implications for the volume of rain falling in that region and in the Plata basin farther south,” Lapola said. Recently published data from a 30-year study of plots across the Amazon basin shows this pattern already starting to emerge, with more drought-tolerant species replacing aging rainforest trees.“The finding that avoidance is one or more orders of magnitude cheaper than accepting damages is quite robust across many types of ecosystem stress,” said Bob Scholes, systems ecologist at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, who was not involved in the study. However, he noted that the high proportion of the final tab contributed by these ecosystem services made the study sensitive to large uncertainties when estimating both their socioeconomic value and the impact of different degrees of AFD on the provision of those services.Many questions remain about how forests will respond to changes in atmospheric carbon, temperature and rainfall patterns, making it difficult to evaluate the chances of a catastrophic AFD event. For example, higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are predicted to increase forest productivity by providing a key ingredient for photosynthesis. If true, this “CO2 fertilization” effect could counteract the effects of increasing drought, averting forest dieback. But experts disagree on the strength of such an effect, and there is evidence that it might be limited by other factors, including a lack of micronutrients to support rapid growth.In 2014, the Fourth Assessment Report of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, co-authored by Scholes, ascribed low confidence to the hypothesis of an Amazon tipping point. “I think it is an ‘even chance,’” Scholes told Mongabay, adding that it was “about as likely as not.”In contrast, earlier this year, noted Amazon scientists Thomas Lovejoy and Carlos Nobre, the latter a co-author of the present study, expressed concern that exceeding 25 percent deforestation in the Amazon region could be enough to send the ecosystem into a cascade of degradation that leaves a new habitat in its wake. Some estimates suggest we have already passed 20 percent deforestation in the biome. “The tipping point is very close at hand,” Lovejoy said.A jaguar lounges by an Amazon river. The Amazon’s rich biodiversity is threatened by large-scale deforestation that could turn vast swaths of the lush rainforest into savanna. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The likelihood that AFD will ever occur continues to be debated. But in light of such enormous projected losses, the present study recommends that governments start investing in a response to it now. “We should not await the impacts of climate change to realize how dependent we — even urban dwellers — are on the Amazon forest,” Lapola said.There are two obvious ways to try to avoid hitting the tipping point in the Amazon: reduce global greenhouse gas emissions, and/or curb Amazon deforestation. While Lapola says the prospect of a significant reduction of emissions in the coming years seems unlikely, the researchers estimated that restoring a large fraction of deforested area and preventing further deforestation would cost about $64 billion.“Reforestation … and minimiz[ing] further deforestation is central to maintaining the integrity of the [water] cycle,” Lovejoy said. However, Lapola said he favored strategies to adapt to AFD rather than prevent it, because the success of the latter was uncertain, whereas adaptive approaches would be beneficial no matter what happened.For example, decentralizing energy generation and providing local electricity-generating capacity to more remote regions could offer greater availability and reliability of electricity across the Amazon. New technology, like in-stream turbines, which allow small-scale energy generation with minimal ecological impact, could be an important part of such a decentralized energy portfolio.Other proposed measures include changes in agricultural practices in favor of more drought-tolerant crops, discouraging the deliberate lighting of fires, and diversifying agroforestry to make farms more resilient to climatic extremes. “Strategies to prevent fire … and restore biodiversity in degraded forest” are needed, said Zemp, citing their utility in helping maintain Amazon rainfall while also preserving vital ecosystem services.The study estimated that the cost of 20 such “no-regrets” adaptation measures would be $122 billion, a fraction of the economic losses estimated if no actions were taken.The study’s “calculation of [the] economic costs makes AFD more tangible for policymakers,” Zemp said, and means that uncertainties about the processes powering AFD are no longer an excuse for politicians’ inaction.Citation:Lapola, D. M., Pinho, P., Quesada, C. A., Strassburg, B. B., Rammig, A., Kruijt, B., … & Vergara, W. (2018). Limiting the high impacts of Amazon forest dieback with no-regrets science and policy action. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 115(46), 11671-11679.last_img read more

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